But she was a sex worker

But she was a sex worker: Samuel Little, America's deadliest serial killer, dies at 80. The Washington PostIn San Diego in 1984, police caught Little in the act. Searching for a suspected rapist, they found Little still zipping up his pants as he emerged from a car where a Black woman lay bloody, seemingly dead. [...]

We Remember: Rickie Jolene Morgan

Part Two of our December 17th - International Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers series. podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/all-in-a-days-sex-work/id1495979113

All December: All In A Days (Sex) Work Podcast 2020-2021

December 17th is International Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers. Started in Seattle in 2003 by Dr. Annie Sprinkle and SWOP-USA as a tribute to the victims of the Green River Killer, December 17th has become a global movement. Here at All In A Day’s (Sex) Work, we will observe December 17th by telling 17 stories. Every day between now and the 17th, I’ll post a mini episode in rememberance of a sex worker lost to violence. On the 17th, SWOP-Behind Bars will be hosting a 24-hour online vigil which is open to the public.

https://www.facebook.com/InternationalDaytoendViolenceAgainstSexWorkers/

New Jersey man, 23, convicted of murdering three women and attempting to slay a fourth | Daily Mail Online

An Essex County (New Jersey) jury deliberated for just two hours on Thursday before convicting Khalil Wheeler-Weaver, 23, who now faces up to a life in prison plus 80 years.

Prosecutors said Wheeler-Weaver, of Orange, killed 20-year-old Sarah Butler, 33-year-old Joanne Brown and 19-year-old Robin West in 2016. They also accuse him of trying to kill another woman, identified in court documents only as T.T. who survived and testified against him at his trial. -Daily Mail Online

Victims, families and America’s thirst for true-crime stories

CrimeCon — now in its third year and hosting a sold-out crowd of 3,600 (up from 1,000 its first year) — represents a major and unprecedented opportunity. Twenty years ago, if victims’ family members wanted to draw media attention to a crime in hopes of shaking loose new leads and motivating law enforcement, there were just a few options — shows like “America’s Most Wanted” and NBC’s “Dateline.” Today, there are thousands. Entire networks — namely, Oxygen and a Discovery Channel offshoot called Investigation Discovery — are devoted to round-the-clock true-crime coverage. Writers like Ann Rule and Michelle McNamara have pioneered a “citizen sleuth” approach to crime, writing books that recount an active, often highly personal participation in the investigation of a murder.