We Continue To Remember: Rickie Jolene Morgan.

Her name was Rickie Jolene Morgan and to her Kensington family she was Layla. She was born on October 8, 1980 and she was approaching her 36th birthday when she was murdered. “Whether you knew her as Rickie or Layla, you loved her,” said Carol, a close friend of Morgan’s. “Layla would sit with women and teach them how to be safe,” said Johanna Berrigan of the Catholic Worker Clinic. “Layla was fiercely intelligent and fiercely justice oriented. She wanted justice for the women in the community.” Friends said that Morgan was a woman passionate about the treatment of her peers in Kensington. The sentiment that passed through the crowd was that Morgan was so much more than the headlines that confirmed her death. Obituary for Rickie Jolene Morgan https://www.kepplegraft.com/notices/Rickie-Morgan

IDTEVASW in Philadelphia Free Press 2018

We, as one global community renew our commitment to solidarity on December 17,” said Melanie Dante, former sex worker who was one of the organizers at the Philadelphia events this year. "December 17 Events aim to raise outrage at violence against sex workers and strengthen sex worker communities and responses to the systematic, daily violence and exclusion sex workers experience.”

D/17 ARTICLE: Under The Red Umbrella

Under The Red Umbrella    Monday, December 17, 2018 will mark the 15th annual observance of the International Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers. As people gather around the globe to celebrate the holidays, some mourn the loss of those close to them. In Philadelphia, the observance features two events. 12 PM - 4 PM  Thomas Paine Plaza and 7PM - 10PM Phila MOCA

2017 Sex Work Victim List

"Its time to change the social perception that she wasn’t a person, she was a “prostitute”. No one wants to feel a sense of community or sameness with her. She was something other than us and therefore we don’t need to feel fear or grief at the fact or the manner of her death.” - Anonymous http://www.december17.org #ourvoiceistheirvoice #restinpower

The Voice Of Alaska: Tara Burns of FOSTA /SESTA

What if I told you that scientists found something that decreases the female homicide rate by 17.4 percent and our government just abolished it? That’s exactly what happened when the Stop Enabling Sex Traffickers Act, HR 1865 (commonly called FOSTA/SESTA), became law on April 11. The bill would allow the government to prosecute websites which knowingly help or promote sex trafficking and also allow users to sue those websites.
Although the Department of Justice went on record warning that FOSTA/SESTA would make it more difficult to prosecute sex trafficking cases, the bill was framed and sold as an anti-trafficking measure. FOSTA/SESTA effectively modified section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, passed in 1996, which exempted websites from criminal charges for the actions of their users.

THXXX Philly dot com!

D/17 PHL Thanks PHILLY dot com, The Daily News and The Inquirer: As allied with the mission of SWOP Behind Bars: "With these efforts we can reduce sexual violence in the US, ameliorate conditions for a marginalized portion of the population, and destigmatize what is a reality for many women."